High Temps and Hot Pets

Pet Ownership -

Prefer visuals? Watch our latest Veteo on the topic of summer heat safety here.

Serious summer heat is here and many animals—especially those outdoors—struggle to keep cool because they can’t process heat as effectively as we do. Here are some tips for keeping your fur-covered friend safe when the weather is warm:

  • Never leave your pet in the car on a sunny or warm, overcast summer day. Even with a window cracked on a 70o day, the interior of your car can reach 100in as little as 20 minutes.
  • Hot asphalt will scorch your pet’s paws. Before you head out for a walk, put your own palm on the pavement—if it’s too hot for you, it’s too hot for your pooch.
  • Do not shave or trim your pet. A pet’s coat is an important part of her natural cooling system, as it protects the skin from the sun.
  • Always provide shade and plenty of cool, fresh water

Symptoms of overheating include excessive panting, increased heart rate and drooling, which can quickly advance to seizures, collapse, vomiting and bloody diarrhea. If your pet exhibits any of these symptoms, start immediate cooling with lukewarm (not cold) wet towels and call us at 503-850-6280 as soon as possible.

Preparing For A Pet-Safe Summer

Summer means getting outdoors, getting on the road, and getting your barbeque on—but it can also be hazardous for your pet. Here are some tips to make sure you and your furry friend have the best summer ever!

  • Don’t let your dog drink seawater, lake water or river water. Water from the ocean can bring on vomiting and dehydration, while lake and river water are often full of bacteria that can cause illness. If there’s a bloom of blue-green algae, your pet could be at risk of liver failure and nervous system damage if they ingest it.
  • Even if your pet is on a tick preventative, it’s a good idea to check for these little dudes after being outdoors. They can jump from pets to people and carry nasty illnesses, including Lyme disease.
  • Cookouts are tasty, but cooked meat bones often splinter and become hazardous if swallowed. Nix the corn cobs, too—they can cause intestinal blockage.
  •  If you’re taking your pet on the road or in the air, health and/or travel certificates from an accredited veterinarian may be required. Our veterinarians can issue those and ensure your pet is healthy enough to travel.
  • Fireworks are fun for us, but the racket is terrifying for many pets. Keep them inside, with calm music or white noise on. For more tips on managing noise aversion for your pet, watch our latest Veteo! If you think your pet may need medication to deal with loud sounds, make an appointment with your Parkway veterinarian now online or by calling  503-343-9735.

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